A randomized trial of the electronic Lung Cancer Symptom Scale for quality-of-life assessment in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

  • J. C. Kuo Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of New South Wales
  • D. M. Graham Queen’s University Belfast, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
  • A. Salvarrey Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
  • F. Kassam Southlake Regional Cancer Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
  • L. W. Le Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
  • F. A. Shepherd Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
  • R. Burkes Mount Sinai Hospital
  • P. J. Hollen University of Virginia
  • R. J. Gralla Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • N. B. Leighl Princess Margaret Cancer Centre
Keywords: Patient-reported outcome, palliative care, supportive care

Abstract

Introduction: Improving health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a key goal of systemic therapy in advanced lung cancer although routine assessment remains challenging. We aimed to analyze the impact of a real-time electronic HRQL tool, the eLCSS-QL, on palliative care referral (PCR) rates, patterns of chemotherapy treatment and use of other supportive interventions in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving first-line chemotherapy.

Methods: Patients with advanced NSCLC starting first-line chemotherapy were randomized to their oncologist receiving or not receiving their eLCSS-QL data before each clinic visit.  Patients completed the eLCSS-QL scoring at baseline, prior to each chemotherapy cycle, and at subsequent follow-up visits until disease progression. Prospective data on PCR rate, HRQL and use of other supportive interventions were collected.

Results: A total of 95 advanced NSCLC patients participated. Oncologists received real-time eLCSS-QL data for 44 patients (eLCSS-QL arm) and used standard clinical assessment only (standard arm) for 51 patients.  The primary end-point, the PCR rate, was numerically higher but statistically similar between patients in the eLCSS-QL and standard arms. HRQL scores over time were not significantly different between the two arms.

Conclusions: The eLCSS-QL is feasible as a tool for use in routine clinical practice, although no statistically significant impact was demonstrated in this study. Improving access to supportive care through the collection of patient reported outcomes and HRQL should be an important component of care for advanced lung cancer patients. 


Author Biographies

J. C. Kuo, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of New South Wales

Division of Medical Oncology

D. M. Graham, Queen’s University Belfast, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

A. Salvarrey, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

F. Kassam, Southlake Regional Cancer Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

L. W. Le, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

F. A. Shepherd, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

R. Burkes, Mount Sinai Hospital

Division of Medical Oncology

P. J. Hollen, University of Virginia

School of Nursing

N. B. Leighl, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre

Division of Medical Oncology

Published
2019-12-05
How to Cite
Kuo, J. C., Graham, D. M., Salvarrey, A., Kassam, F., Le, L. W., Shepherd, F. A., Burkes, R., Hollen, P. J., Gralla, R. J., & Leighl, N. B. (2019). A randomized trial of the electronic Lung Cancer Symptom Scale for quality-of-life assessment in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer. Current Oncology, 27(2). https://doi.org/10.3747/co.27.5651
Section
Palliative Care